Tag Archives: TSRHC

5 Signs Your Injured Athlete May Need a Little Extra Help

Imagine being a 16-year-old athlete, with your whole future ahead of you. You spend all your time playing, thinking and dreaming about soccer. Then, your season abruptly comes to an end with a ligament injury and your doctor tells you there’s no soccer for 6 months, at best.

UntitledOur Sports Medicine Center team knows this scenario all too well. We see athletes of all kinds encounter this, and six months later, they are back on the field. They often express disappointment and anxiety early in the cycle, but their drive to conquer rehabilitation and return to sports wins in the end.

Unfortunately, we also see some athletes that can’t quite get past that anxiety about returning to sports. “If there are any additional stressors at home or school, injury recovery can be a difficult process,” according to Dr. Sandy Roland, TSRHC’s Director of Psychology. She says that being a teenager is tough, but dealing with a life-changing sports injury on top of underlying stressors like depression, family tension, or tough social environments can be too much for some to handle.

Dr. Roland works closely with the sports medicine team to identify concerning signs and symptoms in our injured athletes. Though it’s only a small part of the care we provide, it’s a critical component to pediatric sports medicine. It’s another way we are taking care of the whole athlete, and not just the injury.

Parents, you should ask your child’s medical provider for help if you notice changes in any of these:

  • Sleep patterns
  • Decreased attention or concentration in school
  • Worsening grades
  • Socialization patterns like less time with friends
  • Mood

For information about TSRHC’s Sports Medicine Center, please visit our website at tsrhc.org/sports. For information on TSRHC’s Psychology Department, please visit tsrhc.org/psychology.

 

Winter: the Dolphin with the Prosthetic Tail

wintertail copyA few of our staff members attended the Association of Children’s Orthotic-Prosthetic Clinics (ACPOC) annual conference in Clearwater Beach, FL earlier this month. ACPOC is an association of interdisciplinary professionals who are involved in providing prosthetic-orthotic care for children with limb loss or orthopedic disabilities.  We participated in the conference by presenting two clinical papers, which were very well received and encouraged valuable discussion. The hospital was even specially recognized by ACPOC for our attendance to the conference as a team!

Despite the long hours at the conference, Amanda Brown from Prosthetics and Orthotics and Jesse Kowalski from Physical Therapy managed to squeeze in some time to spend an afternoon at the Clearwater Beach Aquarium. This special aquarium is home to Winter, the famous dolphin. Winter is the only known dolphin in the world missing her tail, and was featured on the big screen in Dolphin Tales.

IMG_0295 copy

Like many of our patients, Winter has scoliosis and kyphosis, which has caused her to wear a prosthetic tail. She wears her prosthetic device during physical therapy sessions to help decrease the progression of the curvature of her spine, and has to do other types of stretching and exercise too. Her prosthesis helps keep her healthy and happy so she can do what dolphins do best… play!

Back to the Basics – TSRHC Sports Medicine Center

Young athletes are working hard to jump higher and run faster. Though strengthening and training programs can be very effective in improving performance, it might be time to get back to the basics of having fun. Did you know playing tag can improve agility, reaction time and hand-eye coordination?

UntitledWhat if we went back in time and reminded our youth to get outside and goof off? Parents of young children recall the days of playing games like “kick the can” and “hide and seek” with neighborhood friends. We can all agree we’ve gotten away from that and need to make an attempt to go back.

We’ve traded all of this free play for organized activities with complicated training and competition schedules. Sometimes, kids are even developing overuse injuries from too many practices or too much too soon. Dr. Shane Miller, TSRHC sports medicine pediatrician, encourages today’s youth to find the balance in participating in both organized sports and free play.

After all, a few good games of tag in the evenings just might be the ticket to a faster speed on the basketball court. Or, maybe, teaching dad some fancy footwork with a soccer ball in the yard might help that football player to be a little quicker on his feet.

For information about TSRHC’s Sports Medicine Center, please visit our website at tsrhc.org/sports.

A World of Expertise, Locally Grown

By Manny Mendoza

When TSRHC hosted the World Hand Symposium, orthopedic physicians from
 19 countries flocked to the hospital to learn about the latest treatments for upper limb disorders. Why Scottish Rite Hospital?

It’s home to two of the world’s preeminent pediatric hand surgeons, consistently ranks as one of the top pediatric orthopedic facilities in America and is renowned for its groundbreaking research.

flowerSuch locally grown leadership from the TSRHC medical staff plants seeds that encourage ideas and innovations to bloom across the globe, cultivating a brighter future for children with orthopedic conditions in the United States and abroad.

In addition to traveling from overseas to attend medical conferences put on by the hospital, doctors come to TSRHC
 to train with its superior medical team. Last year alone, physicians came from 39 countries. They also wrangle for spots in the world-class fellowship programs at TSRHC, taking some of the hospital’s expertise back home with them. They come here because Scottish Rite Hospital’s commitment to the highest standards has put it on the world stage of pediatric orthopedic care.

And the world has taken notice. In addition to international representatives from the medical community, more than 300 current patients from nearly 60 countries travel to TSRHC to benefit from the hospital’s expert treatment. “We are a destination,” says Chief of Staff Daniel J. Sucato, M.D., M.S. “We help set the standard.”

Sucato’s predecessor, now Chief of Staff Emeritus John A. “Tony” Herring, got the international ball rolling in the 1980s when he began visiting countries such as China and Russia, teaching their doctors the Scottish Rite way and treating their patients with TSRHC’s superior know-how. Last year alone, TSRHC physicians and researchers lectured in 15 countries in addition to training medical personnel across the U.S.

The hospital’s training of domestic and foreign physicians results in better care of children with orthopedic conditions around the world, while also spreading TSRHC’s philosophy of providing superior treatment to children regardless of their family’s ability to pay.

How sought after is the hospital’s expertise? More than 160 physicians, or more than 10 percent of the pediatric orthopedic surgeons in North America, completed their advanced instruction in TSRHC fellowship programs. Internationally, Scottish Rite Hospital fellows have come from 21 countries, representing every continent but Antarctica, with many going on to assume leadership roles at medical institutions in their home countries.

The reach of TSRHC’s research team is equally broad. As a major medical research center, the hospital directs international studies such as leading the International Perthes Study Groupa team of physicians from the U.S. and eight other countries who came together to discover new approaches to Perthes disease, a hip disorder.

In addition, the hospital develops innovative treatments that lead to better outcomes for children with pediatric orthopedic disorders. For example, when the TSRH Spinal System for correcting spinal deformities was introduced, it was the most widely used treatment of its kind internationally. The hospital has also established itself as a global leader in limb lengthening and reconstruction, building on the work of Russian physician Gavril A. Ilizarov. Improving on his original frame, TSRHC orthopedists and researchers have created a series of patented limb-lengthening devices recognized around the world.

The impact of Scottish Rite Hospital’s leadership on the direction of pediatric orthopedics is evident through the high-ranking positions TSRHC physicians hold in esteemed medical associations. Chief Medical Officer
 B. Stephens Richards, M.D., recently led the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS). In addition, Richards and Herring are former presidents 
of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA), whose archive is housed at TSRHC. Assistant Chief of Staff Lori A. Karol, M.D., is president-elect of POSNA. She will become the first woman to assume the role of president at POSNA’s annual meeting in May.

With its international influence and dedication to education and collaboration, TSRHC has blossomed from its Texas roots into one of the most respected pediatric orthopedic institutions in the world. In that thriving spirit, TSRHC is constantly growing, evolving and reaching skyward, so that children – no matter where they are – can, too.

**This article was feature as the cover story of our Rite Up Magazine – 2015, Issue 1. View an e-mag version for more stories from this issue.

Assistant Chief of Staff Dr. Lori A. Karol Becomes First Woman to Lead POSNA

Dr. Lori KarolDr. Lori A. Karol, assistant chief of staff at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) and professor of orthopedic surgery at UT Southwestern Medical Center, will become the first woman president of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) on Friday at the organization’s annual meeting in Atlanta.

Dr. Karol is a staff orthopedic surgeon at TSRHC and medical director of Performance Improvement and the Movement Science Laboratory at the hospital. In 2011, she won the Arthur Huene Memorial Award from POSNA for published research on clubfoot. She has been the group’s president-elect for 2014-15 and takes over the presidency from Dr. Gregory A. Mencia, director of pediatric orthopedics at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tenn.

Dr. Karol earned her undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of Michigan and completed her fellowship in pediatric orthopedics and scoliosis at TSRHC in 1991. She joined the hospital in 1994. Dr. Karol is the third TSRHC surgeon to lead POSNA. Dr. J.A. “Tony” Herring, chief of staff emeritus, and Dr. B. Stephens “Steve” Richards, chief medical officer, are past presidents.

“I am immensely honored to be selected to serve as president of POSNA this year, and even more so to serve as the first woman president of our organization,” Dr. Karol said. “When I trained as an orthopedic surgeon, I was the only woman in my program for many years. Now, 40 percent of our newest members are female. POSNA has always been very open and accepting of diversity in its members. I hope my election as president will help open up leadership positions to the young women physicians who are now training in residency programs or are newly in practice. As the mother of three daughters, I want them to have the opportunity to serve as leaders in their careers some day.”

“Dr. Karol is a world class surgeon who cares deeply about the children she treats,” said TSRHC Chief of Staff Dr. Daniel J. Sucato. “Her patient care, teaching and research have improved countless children’s lives and her leadership in the field of pediatric orthopedics is a great example for other physicians to follow. She will make a great POSNA president.”

Dr. Karol is one of almost a dozen TSRHC physicians making presentations at the POSNA annual meeting being held at the Marriott Marquis in Atlanta from Wednesday, April 29, to Saturday, May 2. With more than 1,200 members, POSNA is the preeminent organization for orthopedic surgeons who care for children in the United States and Canada. Its mission is to improve the lives of children through expert orthopedic care.

“We are very active in education of orthopedic surgeons, in advocacy for our pediatric orthopedic patients and in research to better the treatment outcomes for the children we care for,” Dr. Karol said.

Congratulations, Dr. Karol!

Inside Your Latest Rite Up Magazine – 2015, Issue 1

Rite Up, the hospital’s quarterly magazine, hit mailboxes this week! We’re giving you a sneak peek of all the great articles featured in this issue. View your copy at home or take a look at the E-Mag version on our website.

Screen Shot 2015-04-24 at 9.42.21 AM

A World of Expertise, Locally Grown

TSRHC has blossomed from its Texas roots into one of the most respected pediatric orthopedic institutions in the world. Learn more in our cover story article.

A Colorful Celebration of Giving

TSRHC unveils a tribute to the generous donors who make the hospital’s mission possible. Read the article about our newly installed Giving Wall in our Donor Spotlight.

Trustee Profile: Making Each Moment Count

Trustee Tom Higgins has been a Texas Mason for nearly 50 years. Learn how he got involved with Masonry and TSRHC in our Trustee Profile.

New Lawson Fellow

Read about Ozan Razi, M.D., of Cyprus, Turkey, who is our current L. Ray Lawson, M.D., International Pediatric Spine Fellow specializing in the research of spinal deformity.

Patients in the Spotlight: Monkey Business Benefits TSRHC

TSRHC patient Emily, age 9 of Forney, Texas, helps raise funds and children’s spirits with her cheerful sock monkeys!

Hospital Happenings

View photos and updates from the following special events:

  • Amputee Ski Trip
  •  2014 Treasure Street
  • Dallas Cowboys Holiday Visit
  • San Angelo Sporting Clay Shoot
  • Cotton Bowl Visit 

You can also request to be mailed a copy of this quarterly magazine. Please call the Public Relations department at (214) 559-7656 or (800) 421-1121, ext. 7656.

Child Life Spotlight: Empowering children and families to master challenges in health care

For more than 30 years, TSRHC has enlisted the services of our Child Life department as a way to treat the “whole child” and make sure each patient is having a positive experience at the hospital. Through this spotlight we hope you will understand a bit more about the field of Child Life and also learn how you can contact this department for your next visit to TSRHC.

What is Child Life?

Andrea Brown - staff, Tylan McCallister - pt

Child Life Specialists (CLS) 
focus on the social, emotional, developmental and educational needs of children and teenagers in the hospital setting. To help reduce fear and promote coping during the visit, a CLS can provide the following services to your child:

 

 

  • Prepare and support the patient for medical procedures
  • Educate them about their diagnosis
  • Teach coping techniques to use during medical experiences
  • Engage in medical play
  • Provide outlets for self-expression
  • Support for brothers and sisters

Being Admitted to the Hospital?

Staying at the hospital can sometimes be stressful. Children may be nervous, worried, have questions and/or
have behavioral changes prior to a hospitalization.

  • A CLS will meet with your child on admission day to provide age- appropriate preparation for their hospitalization and answer any questions they may have.
  • Pre-admission tours are an extra service available to your child. These can be beneficial to help alleviate nervousness prior to admission day.

Here for a Clinic Appointment?

Coming to the hospital for a clinic appointment can be stressful, too! If your child is nervous or has questions about coming to their appointment, a CLS can help prepare the child by answering questions as well as be present for the following:

  • Cast removal
  • Radiology procedure
  • IV placement
  • 
Lab draw
  • Surgery discussion
  • Joint injection
  • Radiology procedure (MRI, CT, Ultrasound, VCUG, etc)
  • Anything potentially stressful

Who Makes up the Team?

Child Life Specialists are professionals who are certified through the Child Life Council. They hold bachelors and/or masters degrees in child development, psychology, or a related field. Their training includes a specialized internship in a pediatric hospital setting. Other team members include Activity Coordinators, who have a background in child development. Volunteers assist the Activity Coordinators in organizing patient activities in the inpatient playroom.

Meet Our Child Life Team

Andrea Brown, BS, CCLS, Child Life Specialist
Cassandra James, MS, CCLS, Child Life Specialist
Mellina McCormick, BS, CCLS, Child Life Specialist
Brianne Odom, BS, CCLS, Child Life Specialist
Paige Legan, BS, Child Life Activity Coordinator
Sarah Coury-Rios, MME, Child Life Activity Coordinator

How to Contact Child Life

Dominiqe Ramirez - pt, Paige Legan - staff, Diamond Morgan - ptAs a parent or caregiver, you can request that any hospital staff member contact a Child Life Specialist to meet with your child during their appointment.

To schedule a visit with a Child Life Specialist or a pre-admission tour, please contact the Child Life team. Call 214-559-7795 or email child.life@tsrh.org.

 

Patient Family Testimonial

Third Annual Rock the Rite Benefits TSRHC

When their children were still preschoolers, Dr. Lawson Copley and his wife, Erin, took them to a music store and asked them to pick an instrument. Out of that trip grew Kid Vicious, a classic rock cover band that Bennett, 15 (lead guitar, vocals); Austin, 14 (drums, vocals); and Ellis, 12 (bass, harmonica, vocals) formed in 2006 with their dad and some of their friends.

2015_RockTheRiteFlyer_PrintKid Vicious plays mostly charity events, including the third annual Rock the Rite, a concert that the Copleys organized to benefit Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, where Dr. Copley is on staff. The show, March 20 in the Cambridge Room at House of Blues, also features the adult acts Sam Swank, Whiskey Pants and Beau MacDougall.

“Rock music keeps them interested,” says Erin Copley. “It keeps them current. Bennett can play Bach on the guitar, but he would rather play Zeppelin…It’s a lifetime skill.”

Dr. Copley, an orthopaedic surgeon at Scottish Rite Hospital, comes from a musical family. His mother was a piano teacher and is musical director at her church. Before they started rocking, the Copley children received classical training on the piano. Dr. Copley was an early member of the band.

The group also includes Olivia Jennings, 16, on lead vocals; her brother Brian, 14, on keyboards; and Logan Beutel, 14, on rhythm guitar. They have performed at Parish Episcopal School, the Hockaday School, the Dallas Marathon, Sons of Hermann Hall, the Kessler Theater and the Copleys’ annual home music festival.

The band’s major influences include the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, Steppenwolf, the Clash, Garbage and Radiohead.

“We cover their songs because imitation is the best form of flattery,” Bennett says. “We love to play live and do our very best to entertain. Come check us out, but prepare to get your mind blown.”

Rock the Rite began as a way to bring new supporters to Scottish Rite Hospital, Erin Copley says. The nonprofit hospital holds more than 250 fundraising events a year, but none of them is like a Kid Vicious show.

Last year’s Rock the Rite raised more than $14,000 for Scottish Rite Hospital. Tickets for this year’s show benefiting the hospital, which are $38 including service charges, are available online at Live Nation.

Doors open at 7 p.m. Showtime is 7:30.

TSRHC Hip Patient Families Connect Play Date via Facebook

At TSRHC, we take pride in treating the “whole child” – mind, body and spirit, with ancillary services that include child life programs, individualized physical therapy and in-house specialists in anesthesiology, pharmacy, radiology and psychology. We also have specialized sports and recreational programs that encourage socialization and bonding among peers.

Hip Dysplasia Playgroup_02It’s very often that our patient’s experience at TSRHC will go far beyond medical treatment – we hope you make yourself right at home.

And that was exactly what three mothers who share the common bond of raising toddlers with hip dysplasia did. They found each other via Facebook and created a play date on familiar grounds — in TSRHC’s atrium.

The three patients are all being treated in TSRHC’s Center for Excellence in Hip Disorders and are currently in spica casts, which are body casts that are typically used after surgery to help immobilize the hips and thighs.

One mom said, “It has been wonderful to connect with other families who are experiencing the same journey, and Facebook has been great for that but it can’t compare to meeting people in real life and sharing stories, diagnoses, surgery experiences, spica cast care tips, and other lessons learned. I organized the play date for my daughter so she could see other kids in casts that are like her, and I think I probably got more out of it than she did. These moms are amazing.”

Marlee Cole, Evan Hinojosa, Virigina SorrowIn addition to connecting with other patient families via Facebook, TSRHC’s Family Resource Center has a Peer Support Program that connects TSRHC families who have children with the same medical condition or who have had the same procedure. For more information, please contact our Family Resource Center at (214) 559-7573 or (800) 421-1121, ext. 7573, or email frc@tsrh.org.

We don’t want to tell them not to play – TSRHC Sports Medicine Center

LOGO_Vert_SportsMedCntr_croppedThe easy way to take care of an injured athlete is to tell him or her not to play. Here at the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital Sports Medicine Center, we look for every way to get athletes back to the field, and if possible, help them stay active while recovering from an injury. Why?

 

  • There are general health benefits of physical activity
  • Lower body mass index (height to weight ratio) and higher aerobic capacity are associated with improved academic performance
  • There is a positive relationship for sports participation and healthy psychosocial states for adolescents.

Dr. Shane Miller and Dr. Henry Ellis joined their peers in February at the 2nd annual Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine Society (PRISM) meeting. PRISM has brought together a multi-disciplinary team to combine efforts to keep athletes on the field. The meeting, with its attendance of more than 120 of the nation’s pediatric sports medicine specialists, is one of a kind, and our experts took an active role in planning and presenting.

Because of the rise of sports participation in youth, and the concurrent rise in sports injuries, the use of health care resources has increased in this population. Though much progress has been made to ensure that we don’t treat young athletes like little adults, our providers agree that much research is needed.

When tackling the tough topics about how to perform surgery on small joints or how to prevent injuries in contact sports, the consistent theme was not to tell kids not to play. You can trust that our team is constantly working to find answers to these questions…

How do we keep athletes on the field when we do have to treat them? How do we get them back faster?

Learn more about Dr. Miller and Dr. Ellis on our website.