Tag Archives: TSRHC

Is water enough for your young athlete today? – TSRHC Sports Medicine

Water is the “go-to” drink to keep young and growing athletes hydrated for optimal performance. However, sometimes water just isn’t enough to replace electrolytes lost through sweating.

If your young athlete answers yes to any of these questions, he or she may need more than water:

  • Are you going to be playing in a high–intensity activity, lasting longer than an hour?
  • Do you feel salt on your skin after activity?
  • Do you see salt on your clothes after activity?
  • Are you going to be participating in back–to–back events or tournaments?
  • Are you going to be playing in hot or humid conditions, either indoors or outdoors?
  • Do you have a hard time drinking extra fluids on practice and game days?

UntitledAll of these are reasons to supplement a water hydration plan with sports drinks or salty snacks. Incorporating these throughout the day ensures optimal safety, health and performance during each practice and game.

The sodium in these items helps to keep water in the body, replaces lost electrolytes and also stimulates thirst. Thirst encourages the athlete to drink more fluids than he or she may do naturally.

Here are some suggestions to have on hand:

  • Sports drinks
  • Broth-based soups
  • Vegetable or tomato juice
  • Pretzels or salty crackers
  • Pickles
  • String cheese
  • Yogurt

Talk with your young athlete about when to reach for these salty snacks; enjoying them too often can lead to other problems. Your child’s pediatrician or sports dietitian can help design a nutrition plan that’s right for your young athlete.

To learn more about the best ways to hydrate, take a look at our PDF on hydration for young athletes.

For information about TSRHC’s Center for Excellence in Sports Medicine, please visit our website at tsrhc.org/sports.

Stop Overuse Injuries Before They Stop You – TSRHC Sports Medicine

UntitledThere are two types of injuries. Acute injuries, which occur suddenly and typically with a single event; and overuse injuries, which are caused by a gradual wearing down over a period of time. With overuse injuries, body tissues become inflamed with repetitive stresses caused by actions like running, jumping and throwing. In some cases, these actions/stresses cause permanent changes and damage. The stress may come from forceful impact with the ground, stretching of sensitive tissues in growing bones or overstretching of soft tissues around the joints. To protect the tissues, resting from the stressful activity is a must, and sometimes other treatment is required. Philip Wilson, M.D. says, “With the right action plan, overuse injuries and long-term complications can be avoided.”

Tips for all young athletes to prevent overuse injuries

  • Focus on proper form. Seek advice from experts to learn proper form. More importantly, stop practicing when fatigue leads to changes in form.
  • Recognize warning signs of overuse injury: pain, swelling and poor form. When these things happen, immediately take a break.
  • Keep a balanced training schedule. Each week, save a day or two for rest. Or switch to different activities that emphasize different body parts and training intensity levels.
  • Participate in more than one sport. Changing movements and training patterns helps to reduce the risk of injury as well as assist with overall athletic development.
  • Know your sport and the risks associated with it. Sports like baseball, volleyball and running are more likely to cause overuse injuries than contact and cutting sports like football, soccer and lacrosse (acute injuries are more common with these).

For information about TSRHC’s Center for Excellence in Sports Medicine, please visit our website at tsrhc.org/sports.

TSRHC Patient Autumn-Rose Encourages Others to Dream Big

After years of hip pain, Autumn-Rose and her mom knew something wasn’t quite right. Through her years of running track at Coronado High School, Autumn-Rose had experienced pain so intense in her hip that sometimes she couldn’t even walk. Doctor after doctor, every answer was different and no one seemed to be able to resolve the issue. Finally, a Lubbock orthopedist diagnosed Autumn-Rose with hip dysplasia and referred her to Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children where Chief of Staff Dr. Daniel Sucato performed surgery in January 2012.

ARDream Big

Autumn-Rose did not let this obstacle hold her back. After surgery, she quickly returned to the activities that she loves, like running track, cheering for both her school and a competitive squad, and competing in beauty pageants. She was crowned Miss Limestone County Outstanding Teen and won the Miss South Texas Outstanding Teen pageant.

Autumn-Rose chose to make the most of her days in the spotlight at beauty pageants by empowering other young people. She used her platform, “Dream Big: Overcoming Medical Hardships,” to talk about her experience with hip dysplasia and encourage others to dream big and live fearlessly.

_WAT1972Looking Ahead

Autumn-Rose will attend Sam Houston State University in Huntsville this fall, majoring in forensic chemistry. She has made the cheer squad and will cheer for the Sam Houston Bearkats at their football and basketball games. This summer she took time off from Miss Texas to be a counselor at Ceta Canyon Christian Church Camp.

 

It Helps to Hydrate – TSRHC Sports Medicine

Do you ever feel sluggish or unable to focus during a practice or game? Are you frustrated because you know you have gotten ample sleep, have eaten well, and have had great practices up until now?  When you feel this way, do you question why?

UntitledThe answer may be in what you are drinking… or not drinking.

During and after events, the body needs water to

–       Sweat to keep the body cool
–       Keep energy levels up
–       Be alert and stay focused
–       Recover optimally

A dehydrated athlete may also feel early fatigue, headache and decreased focus and attention, all of which may hinder performance during the event.

If you are feeling any of these things, it may be time to take a look at your hydration plan.  How much, when, and what are you drinking?

A few simple rules to follow for optimal hydration are:

  • Drink water throughout the day.
    • Start your event hydrated!
  • Drink plenty of water during and after the event as well.
    • This will help the athlete maintain a safe body temperature and enable quick recovery.
  • Know other ways to hydrate when water is not enough.
    • Try drinking milk or fresh fruit smoothies.
    • Try eating yogurt, fresh fruits like grapes, apples, & oranges and fresh vegetables like bell peppers, spinach, cucumbers, and broccoli. 

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To learn more about the best ways to hydrate, take a look at our PDF on hydration and talk with your doctor, athletic trainer, or sports dietitian to help build a hydration plan that is right for you.

For information about TSRHC’s Center for Excellence in Sports Medicine, please visit our website at tsrhc.org/sports.

What turns a young athlete into a lifelong athlete? – TSRHC Sports Medicine

Various specialties have studied the characteristics that make a young athlete stick with his or her sport. From a psychological perspective, those who think sports are fun are more likely to continue to participate in sports and later, lead a healthier lifestyle that includes physical activity.

softballAround 12 or 13 years old, athletes progress to a more competitive sport environment and the pressures really start to grow. Winning, or being the best, becomes more important as elite team tryouts and college scholarship dreams come into play.

According to TSRHC Psychology Fellow and Sport Psychologist, Dr. Erica Force, this is the window of time where athletes begin to drop out of sports completely. “To keep our kids participating in physical activity for the long term, it’s important for parents to foster a positive and fun environment. Parents can do that by asking questions that focus on effort and hard work rather than only asking questions about results of the competition.”

Here are some ideas to help shift the conversation from negative to positive:

  • Be a good listener and offer encouragement regardless of the outcome of a game
  • Keep your own emotions under control
  • Ask about their experience while playing:
    • Did you put forth your best effort?
    • Did you have fun?
    • Did you help your team?
    • Were you a good sport?

For information about TSRHC’s Sports Medicine Center, please visit our website at tsrhc.org/sports. For information on TSRHC’s Psychology Department, please visit tsrhc.org/psychology.

5 Signs Your Injured Athlete May Need a Little Extra Help

Imagine being a 16-year-old athlete, with your whole future ahead of you. You spend all your time playing, thinking and dreaming about soccer. Then, your season abruptly comes to an end with a ligament injury and your doctor tells you there’s no soccer for 6 months, at best.

UntitledOur Sports Medicine team knows this scenario all too well. We see athletes of all kinds encounter this, and six months later, they are back on the field. They often express disappointment and anxiety early in the cycle, but their drive to conquer rehabilitation and return to sports wins in the end.

Unfortunately, we also see some athletes that can’t quite get past that anxiety about returning to sports. “If there are any additional stressors at home or school, injury recovery can be a difficult process,” according to Dr. Sandy Roland, TSRHC’s Director of Psychology. She says that being a teenager is tough, but dealing with a life-changing sports injury on top of underlying stressors like depression, family tension, or tough social environments can be too much for some to handle.

Dr. Roland works closely with the sports medicine team to identify concerning signs and symptoms in our injured athletes. Though it’s only a small part of the care we provide, it’s a critical component to pediatric sports medicine. It’s another way we are taking care of the whole athlete, and not just the injury.

Parents, you should ask your child’s medical provider for help if you notice changes in any of these:

  • Sleep patterns
  • Decreased attention or concentration in school
  • Worsening grades
  • Socialization patterns like less time with friends
  • Mood

For information about TSRHC’s Center for Excellence in Sports Medicine, please visit our website at tsrhc.org/sports. For information on TSRHC’s Psychology Department, please visit tsrhc.org/psychology.

 

Winter: the Dolphin with the Prosthetic Tail

wintertail copyA few of our staff members attended the Association of Children’s Orthotic-Prosthetic Clinics (ACPOC) annual conference in Clearwater Beach, FL earlier this month. ACPOC is an association of interdisciplinary professionals who are involved in providing prosthetic-orthotic care for children with limb loss or orthopedic disabilities.  We participated in the conference by presenting two clinical papers, which were very well received and encouraged valuable discussion. The hospital was even specially recognized by ACPOC for our attendance to the conference as a team!

Despite the long hours at the conference, Amanda Brown from Prosthetics and Orthotics and Jesse Kowalski from Physical Therapy managed to squeeze in some time to spend an afternoon at the Clearwater Beach Aquarium. This special aquarium is home to Winter, the famous dolphin. Winter is the only known dolphin in the world missing her tail, and was featured on the big screen in Dolphin Tales.

IMG_0295 copy

Like many of our patients, Winter has scoliosis and kyphosis, which has caused her to wear a prosthetic tail. She wears her prosthetic device during physical therapy sessions to help decrease the progression of the curvature of her spine, and has to do other types of stretching and exercise too. Her prosthesis helps keep her healthy and happy so she can do what dolphins do best… play!

Back to the Basics – TSRHC Sports Medicine

Young athletes are working hard to jump higher and run faster. Though strengthening and training programs can be very effective in improving performance, it might be time to get back to the basics of having fun. Did you know playing tag can improve agility, reaction time and hand-eye coordination?

UntitledWhat if we went back in time and reminded our youth to get outside and goof off? Parents of young children recall the days of playing games like “kick the can” and “hide and seek” with neighborhood friends. We can all agree we’ve gotten away from that and need to make an attempt to go back.

We’ve traded all of this free play for organized activities with complicated training and competition schedules. Sometimes, kids are even developing overuse injuries from too many practices or too much too soon. Dr. Shane Miller, TSRHC sports medicine pediatrician, encourages today’s youth to find the balance in participating in both organized sports and free play.

After all, a few good games of tag in the evenings just might be the ticket to a faster speed on the basketball court. Or, maybe, teaching dad some fancy footwork with a soccer ball in the yard might help that football player to be a little quicker on his feet.

For information about TSRHC’s Center for Excellence in Sports Medicine, please visit our website at tsrhc.org/sports.

A World of Expertise, Locally Grown

By Manny Mendoza

When TSRHC hosted the World Hand Symposium, orthopedic physicians from
 19 countries flocked to the hospital to learn about the latest treatments for upper limb disorders. Why Scottish Rite Hospital?

It’s home to two of the world’s preeminent pediatric hand surgeons, consistently ranks as one of the top pediatric orthopedic facilities in America and is renowned for its groundbreaking research.

flowerSuch locally grown leadership from the TSRHC medical staff plants seeds that encourage ideas and innovations to bloom across the globe, cultivating a brighter future for children with orthopedic conditions in the United States and abroad.

In addition to traveling from overseas to attend medical conferences put on by the hospital, doctors come to TSRHC
 to train with its superior medical team. Last year alone, physicians came from 39 countries. They also wrangle for spots in the world-class fellowship programs at TSRHC, taking some of the hospital’s expertise back home with them. They come here because Scottish Rite Hospital’s commitment to the highest standards has put it on the world stage of pediatric orthopedic care.

And the world has taken notice. In addition to international representatives from the medical community, more than 300 current patients from nearly 60 countries travel to TSRHC to benefit from the hospital’s expert treatment. “We are a destination,” says Chief of Staff Daniel J. Sucato, M.D., M.S. “We help set the standard.”

Sucato’s predecessor, now Chief of Staff Emeritus John A. “Tony” Herring, got the international ball rolling in the 1980s when he began visiting countries such as China and Russia, teaching their doctors the Scottish Rite way and treating their patients with TSRHC’s superior know-how. Last year alone, TSRHC physicians and researchers lectured in 15 countries in addition to training medical personnel across the U.S.

The hospital’s training of domestic and foreign physicians results in better care of children with orthopedic conditions around the world, while also spreading TSRHC’s philosophy of providing superior treatment to children regardless of their family’s ability to pay.

How sought after is the hospital’s expertise? More than 160 physicians, or more than 10 percent of the pediatric orthopedic surgeons in North America, completed their advanced instruction in TSRHC fellowship programs. Internationally, Scottish Rite Hospital fellows have come from 21 countries, representing every continent but Antarctica, with many going on to assume leadership roles at medical institutions in their home countries.

The reach of TSRHC’s research team is equally broad. As a major medical research center, the hospital directs international studies such as leading the International Perthes Study Groupa team of physicians from the U.S. and eight other countries who came together to discover new approaches to Perthes disease, a hip disorder.

In addition, the hospital develops innovative treatments that lead to better outcomes for children with pediatric orthopedic disorders. For example, when the TSRH Spinal System for correcting spinal deformities was introduced, it was the most widely used treatment of its kind internationally. The hospital has also established itself as a global leader in limb lengthening and reconstruction, building on the work of Russian physician Gavril A. Ilizarov. Improving on his original frame, TSRHC orthopedists and researchers have created a series of patented limb-lengthening devices recognized around the world.

The impact of Scottish Rite Hospital’s leadership on the direction of pediatric orthopedics is evident through the high-ranking positions TSRHC physicians hold in esteemed medical associations. Chief Medical Officer
 B. Stephens Richards, M.D., recently led the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS). In addition, Richards and Herring are former presidents 
of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA), whose archive is housed at TSRHC. Assistant Chief of Staff Lori A. Karol, M.D., is president-elect of POSNA. She will become the first woman to assume the role of president at POSNA’s annual meeting in May.

With its international influence and dedication to education and collaboration, TSRHC has blossomed from its Texas roots into one of the most respected pediatric orthopedic institutions in the world. In that thriving spirit, TSRHC is constantly growing, evolving and reaching skyward, so that children – no matter where they are – can, too.

**This article was feature as the cover story of our Rite Up Magazine – 2015, Issue 1. View an e-mag version for more stories from this issue.

Assistant Chief of Staff Dr. Lori A. Karol Becomes First Woman to Lead POSNA

Dr. Lori KarolDr. Lori A. Karol, assistant chief of staff at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) and professor of orthopedic surgery at UT Southwestern Medical Center, will become the first woman president of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) on Friday at the organization’s annual meeting in Atlanta.

Dr. Karol is a staff orthopedic surgeon at TSRHC and medical director of Performance Improvement and the Movement Science Laboratory at the hospital. In 2011, she won the Arthur Huene Memorial Award from POSNA for published research on clubfoot. She has been the group’s president-elect for 2014-15 and takes over the presidency from Dr. Gregory A. Mencia, director of pediatric orthopedics at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tenn.

Dr. Karol earned her undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of Michigan and completed her fellowship in pediatric orthopedics and scoliosis at TSRHC in 1991. She joined the hospital in 1994. Dr. Karol is the third TSRHC surgeon to lead POSNA. Dr. J.A. “Tony” Herring, chief of staff emeritus, and Dr. B. Stephens “Steve” Richards, chief medical officer, are past presidents.

“I am immensely honored to be selected to serve as president of POSNA this year, and even more so to serve as the first woman president of our organization,” Dr. Karol said. “When I trained as an orthopedic surgeon, I was the only woman in my program for many years. Now, 40 percent of our newest members are female. POSNA has always been very open and accepting of diversity in its members. I hope my election as president will help open up leadership positions to the young women physicians who are now training in residency programs or are newly in practice. As the mother of three daughters, I want them to have the opportunity to serve as leaders in their careers some day.”

“Dr. Karol is a world class surgeon who cares deeply about the children she treats,” said TSRHC Chief of Staff Dr. Daniel J. Sucato. “Her patient care, teaching and research have improved countless children’s lives and her leadership in the field of pediatric orthopedics is a great example for other physicians to follow. She will make a great POSNA president.”

Dr. Karol is one of almost a dozen TSRHC physicians making presentations at the POSNA annual meeting being held at the Marriott Marquis in Atlanta from Wednesday, April 29, to Saturday, May 2. With more than 1,200 members, POSNA is the preeminent organization for orthopedic surgeons who care for children in the United States and Canada. Its mission is to improve the lives of children through expert orthopedic care.

“We are very active in education of orthopedic surgeons, in advocacy for our pediatric orthopedic patients and in research to better the treatment outcomes for the children we care for,” Dr. Karol said.

Congratulations, Dr. Karol!