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Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Brian, age 18 of Dallas

About Brian:

Screenshot_2014-01-28-17-56-44-1-1Brian, age 18, of Dallas, Texas, has been a patient at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children for the past 10 years. He was born with a condition that caused both of his legs to be amputated. TSRHC has changed Brian’s life and has given him many opportunities he never thought he would have. He is looking forward to the Amputee Ski Trip, because he loves to water ski but has never been snow skiing. Brian enjoys spending his time playing guard for the Dallas Junior Wheelchair Mavericks basketball team.  In his free time he loves to workout, hangout with his friends and read. Brian hopes to receive a scholarship to attend the University of Texas at Arlington!

 

About TSRHC’s Amputee Ski Trip: 

Since 1981, Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children has hosted an Annual Amputee Ski Trip for patients. Fourteen teenage patients, as well as medical staff and chaperones, spend a week at the National Sports Center for the Disabled (NSCD), in Winter Park, Colorado.

In a continuing effort to improve the lives of patients, Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children recognized that snow skiing is well suited for amputees, and with special equipment, they quickly become competitive and often excel at the sport.

Skiing at the renowned National Sports Center for the Disabled creates a focus for the trip, but the personal growth and challenges the teens overcome are often more life-changing than the actual accomplishment of skiing. The goal of the trip is to foster a sense of self-confidence, discovery and independence for these teens.

Since the first Amputee Ski Trip in 1981, the community has teamed up with the hospital to make this opportunity possible to patient families. American Airlines has sponsored the trip since 2005. Prior to that, Delta Airlines supported the event for more than 20 years. Multiple supporters include the Lone Star Skier’s Club of Dallas, Smith Group Asset Management, The Women’s Charity League of Park Cities, TSRHC volunteers and many others.

 

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Austin, age 18, of Leonard

About Austin: 

AustinAustin, age 18, of Leonard, Texas, has been a patient at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children since he was born. He was born with numerous challenges and underwent several surgeries on his hands and feet after birth, causing both of his feet to be amputated at a young age. He considers the hospital his second home, since he continues to require one to two surgeries per year. Despite his challenges, Austin always remains positive, upbeat and a constant encouragement to his entire community. Austin serves on student government and plays trumpet at Leonard High School. This will be Austin’s second time going on the Amputee Ski Trip and he is excited to spend time with the friends he made from the trip last year, as well as meet new friends this year.

About TSRHC’s Amputee Ski Trip: 

Since 1981, Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children has hosted an Annual Amputee Ski Trip for patients. Fourteen teenage patients, as well as medical staff and chaperones, spend a week at the National Sports Center for the Disabled (NSCD), in Winter Park, Colorado.

annual-ski-singleIn a continuing effort to improve the lives of patients, Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children recognized that snow skiing is well suited for amputees, and with special equipment, they quickly become competitive and often excel at the sport.

Skiing at the renowned National Sports Center for the Disabled creates a focus for the trip, but the personal growth and challenges the teens overcome are often more life-changing than the actual accomplishment of skiing. The goal of the trip is to foster a sense of self-confidence, discovery and independence for these teens.

Since the first Amputee Ski Trip in 1981, the community has teamed up with the hospital to make this opportunity possible to patient families. American Airlines has sponsored the trip since 2005. Prior to that, Delta Airlines supported the event for more than 20 years. Multiple supporters include the Lone Star Skier’s Club of Dallas, Smith Group Asset Management, The Women’s Charity League of Park Cities, TSRHC volunteers and many others.

Third Grade Student Publishes Book to Raise Money for TSRHC

As a seven year old with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), Emily Hough has accomplished more than most. While receiving treatment at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC), Emily had the idea to create sock monkeys for other children that were preparing for surgery.

Raising Money for TSRHC

Emily’s condition is an autoimmune dysfunction that affects just 3 out of 1 million children. Though it is rare it appears mostly in females.  JDM is often mistaken for muscular dystrophy as it has similar symptoms; however, in reality they are very different. The symptoms include muscle weakness, muscle inflammation, red rashes on the face, hands, and other major body joints, and calcium deposits under the skin.

These symptoms are products of the body’s immune system attacking its own blood vessels. Despite being a patient herself, Emily wanted to help others in the hospital, as well as help the hospital itself. Since establishing Emily’s Monkeys, she has had a few opportunities to donate her creations, but she continues to reach higher and higher.

Starting Small and Going Strong

Emily’s father Josh thought it would be a good idea to start a fundraiser, and where better than Emily’s favorite donut shop, The Hole Thing in Forney, Texas? They created special monkey-shaped donuts, doubled all of the proceeds, and delivered it to TSRHC.

Since then, Emily has not let her JDM hold her back. She co-wrote and published her first children’s book based on her sock monkeys and has been paying it forward ever since. Not only has she donated copies of the book to TSRHC and local schools, she is donating thirty percent of the book’s proceeds to three different charities: the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital, the Make-A-Wish Foundation and CureJM.

Photo Credit: Forney ISD Director of Communications Larry Coker

Local High School Students Visit Patients at TSRHC

Every once in a while we are fortunate enough to witness the results of wonderful acts of kindness performed by individuals around the world.  This holiday season was no exception with students from Williams High School in Plano, Texas visiting patients at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children in Dallas.

From One Child to Another

TSRHC Patients Visited by Students

The students from Williams High School were Peer Assistance and Leadership members who arrived at the hospital to offer the experience of making holiday crafts to children who were recuperating from surgery.  The process of returning to full strength after surgery can be difficult, and the craft workshop that the high school students set up in the hospital’s recreation room was a perfect way to help the patients say focused on positive things.  The students greatly enjoyed the experience, cherishing the memories and friendships they made during the process.

A Special Hospital

Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children has long since been a haven where children from all backgrounds could receive the medical care they needed.  Started in 1921 by Texas Masons who wanted to treat children with polio, regardless of the resources the children’s families possessed, TRSRC is now a leading pediatric orthopedic center that has treated more than 210,000 children.

Medical Leaders

Countless families owe the health, of their children to the caring, selfless caregivers of TSRHC. TSRHC is a leader in the medical community in a number of areas, all revolving around the health and well-being of anyone under 18 years of age.  Whether children are in need of prosthetics or treatment for scoliosis, TSRHC is able to provide the best medical care regardless of a patient’s ability to pay. See how you can help today by volunteering or donating!

Photo Credit: Chris Coats at Dallas Morning News

Dallas Cowboys Touchdown with Kids at TSRHC

After a frustrating loss against the Green Bay Packers on Sunday, teammates were given the chance to put aside their pain and heal their spirits by a trip to the hospital.  The hospital visit wasn’t originally arranged for the benefit of the players, but for the children being treated for a range of medical difficulties at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children. But the trip proved to be a blessing for both.

DeMarco Murray’s Experience

NFL Player Visits TSRHC

The Cowboy’s running back, DeMarco Murray was perhaps one of the most frustrated players of the day.  But he said the moment he got up and thought about visiting the kids at TSRHC, his anger was abated.  Monday was about the kids, and he was glad for the opportunity to lift the spirits of those brave, young kids.  In fact, he said that seeing them facing their own difficult problems gave him perspective.  He said, “Just knowing what these kids are going through on a daily basis, how much fight they have, just makes you look up to them.”  (My San Antonio Blog – Tom Orsborn)

After signing autographs and hanging out with the kids, Murray continued by saying that it was “such a blessing and I cherish these types of moments just to put a smile on these types of kids’ faces. This is something we will never forget and it’s something we will never forget as players.”

The Kids

The patients at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children are treated for a range of orthopedic conditions and certain related neurological and learning disorders.  The hospital works hard to let kids enjoy being kids, despite their medical issues.  This visit from the Dallas Cowboys football players was just one of many ways the hospital and community work together to brighten the lives of these kids and their families.

Check out our website and see what you can do to benefit the lives of the patients at TSRHC!

Santa to arrive via Bell helicopter to TSRHC

WHO: Santa and Mrs. Claus
United States Marines from Marine Toys for Tots Foundation
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) patients, families and staff

WHAT: Santa, Mrs. Claus and members of the United States Marines will arrive at TSRHC in style by way of a Bell helicopter 407. After landing the helicopter on the hospital’s rooftop Helipad and being greeted by TSRHC patients, the group will spread holiday cheer and deliver toys to patients. This is an annual event at TSRHC, made possible by Santa USA, Bell Helicopter and Marine Toys for Tots Foundation. This year, Bell Helicopter donated the helicopter flight to transport the Santa USA crew and the Marines from the Toys for Tots Foundation to TSRHC.

WHEN: Thursday, December 19, 2013
1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

WHERE: Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children
2222 Welborn Street
Dallas, Texas 75219
*Note: Please meet a TSRHC representative at the Ground Level of the D Parking Garage at the end of Welborn Street to be escorted to the event. Security will direct you.

ABOUT: Santa USA began in the mid 1970s as a personal project of a single individual. He was determined to bring happiness, goodwill and holiday spirit to the children of our community. His dedication was noticed by many goodhearted neighbors, and as their interest grew, these good people began to contribute their time and money. For several days in mid-December, Santa travels by helicopter to visit elementary schools in many areas as well as nursing homes and hospitals.

TSRHC Leads the Charge on Perthes Disease Research

While TSRHC is known across the globe for its excellence in pediatric orthopaedics, it is also recognized for groundbreaking research. The studies TSRHC staff participate in allow physicians worldwide to better understand various orthopaedic conditions.

One particular research study focuses on Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease (LCPD), a condition that affects the femoral head or the “ball” part of the hip joint. In Perthes Disease, the blood supply to the femoral head is disrupted and all or part of the femoral head dies from the lack of blood flow.

A History of Research

Twenty years ago, Tony Herring, M.D., started a large, prospective multi-center study with the purpose of understanding the outcomes of pediatric patients with Perthes Disease. Participating institutions treated patients with five different methods: non-surgical treatment, which included bracing and physical therapy; surgical treatment, which included femoral or pelvic osteotomy; and observation. Herring and his colleagues published their findings in the 2004 Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

Herring, along with Dan Sucato, M.D., M.S., led the efforts to invite the patients from the study who were treated non-operatively back to TSRHC for a clinical, radiographic and functional evaluation.

“The results of this study gave us the unique opportunity to review the long-term outcomes of patients who were treated with non-operative intervention. We found that the majority of these patients complained of increasing pain and dysfunction. This was the first study to document these findings at 20-year follow-up,” said Sucato. These results were published last year in The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

Sucato was recently awarded the Angela Kuo Memorial Award, a $30,000 grant, from the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) at the 2013 POSNA Annual Meeting. This grant will be used to fund the third part of this study, which will review the clinical, functional and radiographic outcomes of patients originally treated with surgery. At this time, 18 patients from across the nation have participated in the follow-up study.

Follow-up Study for the Future

One of these patients, Jaclyn Davidson, age 30, recently visited TSRHC for an evaluation with Sucato and Harry Kim, M.D., M.S. Davidson was originally treated with pelvic surgery when she was 7 years old.

“Having the opportunity to evaluate patients like Ms. Davidson after 20 years of follow-up allows us to keep learning about the long-term effects of treatment patterns for Perthes Disease. We are grateful for their time and efforts. The results of this data will help us improve treatments for our current patients with Perthes Disease,” Sucato noted.

As the study moves forward, TSRHC staff will continue to learn more about the condition and how to better treat patients who are affected by it.

To learn more about the disease and the multicenter study research for current patients with Perthes Disease happening at TSRHC, please visit: www.perthesdisease.org.

Dallas Marathon Patient Champion Spotlight: Kaylee, age 9, of Tyler

In addition to the junior race director, the Dallas Marathon features 5 patient champions from  TSRHC. The patient champion program is a way for the community to participate in race-weekend activities and fundraise on behalf of a patient.

Kaylee Mitchell age 9 of Tyler 10-21-2013_23

Kaylee, age 9, of Tyler, Texas, has been a patient of TSRHC since she was 2 years old. She receives treatment at TSRHC for a hammered toe and in TSRHC’s CharlesE. Seay, Jr. Hand Center for a duplicate thumb. The hospital’s Charles E. Seay, Jr. Hand Center provides unique, specialized care for children with hand and upper limb deformities through quality patient care, education and research. The Center’s goal is for each child to obtain the best function and highest level of independence as possible. Thanks to the treatment Kaylee receives at TSRHC for her hand and foot differences have not slowed her down. She appreciates her doctors at TSRHC for encouraging her to pursue her love of gymnastics. Thanks to the constant encouragment she received from the hospital, she has Olympic aspirations and wants to eventually be a gymnastics coach. When visiting the hospital, Kaylee enjoys playing outside on the playground and viewing the sports memorabilia on display in the hospital’s Olympic Clinic. She is so excited to cheer on the runners at the 2013 Dallas Marathon!

Read more about Kaylee and ways for you to get involved in the Dallas Marathon at www.dallasmarathon.com.

Dallas Marathon Patient Champion Spotlight: Case, age 17, of Dallas

In addition to the junior race director, the Dallas Marathon features 5 patient champions from  TSRHC. The patient champion program is a way for the community to participate in race-weekend activities and fundraise on behalf of a patient.

Case Bradham 10-21-2013_10

Case, age 17, of Dallas, Texas, is a man of many talents. He is a star in both sports and academics as well as a poetry writer, fluent Spanish speaker and guitar player. In 2011 he was diagnosed with hip dysplasia, a condition that causes abnormal functioning in the hip joint. When you are as active and talented as Case, the only thing that you want to know is, “how soon can this be fixed?” In May of 2011, TSRHC’s Chief of Staff Daniel J. Sucato, M.D., M.S., performed a procedure called periacetabular osteotomy, which is a surgery that changes the shape of the hip joint. Since his surgery, Case has come to know and love the hospital and all of his doctors. In fact, due to his experiences at TSRHC, he has been inspired to pursue a career as a doctor. Earlier this year, Case had an internship with TSRHC where he was able to co-author three medical publications and shadowed Dr. Sucato and TSRHC’s Director of the Sarah M. and Charles E. Seay Center for Musculoskeletal Research, Harry Kim, M.D., in several surgeries. As a nod to his thankfulness and love for the hospital, he plans to sign his letter of intent to play college football at the hospital later this year. Case can’t wait to be cheering on fellow athletes at this year’s marathon!

Read more about Case and ways for you to get involved in the Dallas Marathon at www.dallasmarathon.com.

Dallas Marathon Patient Champion Spotlight: Brooklyn, age 4, of Arlington

In addition to the junior race director, the Dallas Marathon features 5 patient champions from  TSRHC. The patient champion program is a way for the community to participate in race-weekend activities and fundraise on behalf of a patient.

Brooklyn Gibson _09

Brooklyn, age 4, of Arlington, Texas, and her family have received a Texas-sized welcome since relocating from Illinois. After Brooklyn was diagnosed with spina bifida at birth, her family sought the best treatment for her condition and found Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children in Dallas. Her family made the critical decision to relocate to Texas so that Brooklyn could receive treatment for not only spina bifida but also the subsequent orthopedic needs that come with the diagnosis.  Spina bifida is a pediatric developmental disorder caused by the incomplete closing of the embryonic neural tube. TSRHC has two specialty clinics for children with developmental disabilities. In these clinics, children with spina bifida and other conditions, such as cerebral palsy, learn how to care for themselves, maximize their health and be as independent as possible. She is also seen by the hospital’s world class orthotics team who provide Brooklyn with braces  for her legs that provide additional support when she walks. Her parents have noticed since coming to TSRHC, her personality has really blossomed and that she has developed an active and playful imagination. She loves to “play house” with her dolls and also enjoys visiting the fish tanks and watching the trains in between therapy sessions at TSRHC. Brooklyn is looking forward to representing the hospital as a Patient Champion at the 2013 metroPCS Dallas Marathon.

Read more about Brooklyn and ways for you to get involved in the Dallas Marathon at www.dallasmarathon.com.