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Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Anthony, age 15 of Fort Worth

Anthony is an active 15 year old from Fort Worth, Texas. In 2008, Anthony had an accident and one of his legs was amputated below the knee. That hasn’t slowed him down. Anthony is very athletic and played on his school basketball team up until this year. He has never been to Colorado and is excited about the chance to try both skiing and snowboarding for the first time. Anthony has signed up to take a class in welding, and he thinks he may want to be a welder when he grows up. He says welding is a combination of art and technology, and that really excites him. Eventually, Anthony thinks he might want to attend Baylor University.

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2017 will mark the 36th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences receive practical recreational therapy, while also having the opportunity to grow, build confidence and bond with others similar to them.

For more information, visit scottishritehospital.org/amputee-ski-trip.

Nutrition Tips for Young Basketball Players

It is important for young and growing athletes to eat regularly scheduled and well-balanced meals throughout the school day. It’s best to plan ahead for additional snacks and water to make sure the athlete is optimally fueled and hydrated when there is an afterschool sports event.

Here are some tips regarding practice and game day fuel for young basketball players from Taylor Fisher, M.S., R.D., L.D., Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children dietitian.

Use these tips to plan ahead so that your athletes have nutritious choices for their backpacks:

  • Pack a water bottle for sipping throughout the day as well as during and after the event.
  • Take foods that help hydrate (i.e.: grapes, pears, oranges, yogurts).
  • Pack snacks with complex carbohydrates and protein to provide nourishment throughout the school day and after the event (i.e.: chocolate milk, apple slices with string cheese, trail mix).
  • Bring snacks with more easily digested carbohydrates for snacks right before and during the event (i.e.: fresh or dried fruit, applesauce, pretzels, fig bars).

A great way to help your young athletes develop healthy habits is to include them in the planning and shopping for their meals and snacks. Fisher says, “These lessons can instill healthy habits early in life that carry on beyond youth sports and into college and adulthood where they are responsible for their own food and nutrition choices.”

For more information about injury prevention, nutrition and pediatric sports medicine, please visit our website at scottishritehospital.org/sports.

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Aryanna, age 14 of Weatherford

Aryana_BlogAryanna, age 14 of Weatherford, has been a patient at Scottish Rite Hospital since she was 3 years old. She uses a prosthesis because of a lower limb difference in which one leg is shorter than the other. However, her time at the hospital began with having both scoliosis and hip surgery when she was younger.

Today, Aryanna is part of a color guard team and enjoys performing in theatre. When she grows up, she hopes to become a forensic pathologist. This is Aryanna’s first time to go on the ski trip and she is looking forward to meeting new friends who can relate to the same life struggles.

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2017 will mark the 36th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences receive practical recreational therapy, while also having the opportunity to grow, build confidence and bond with others similar to them.

For more information, visit scottishritehospital.org/amputee-ski-trip.

Backpack Safety Tips

Backpacks are a popular and practical way for children and teenagers to carry school books and supplies. Compared to shoulder bags, messenger bags or purses, backpacks are better because the back and the abdominal muscles support the weight of the backpack. When a backpack is worn correctly, the weight is evenly distributed across the body so shoulder, neck and back injuries are less common.

Backpack SafetyIf a backpack is too heavy or is used incorrectly it can cause muscle joint strain and cause back pain. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children do not carry more than 10-15% of their body weight in their backpacks. For example, if a child weighs 80 pounds, a backpack should not weigh more than 8 to 12 pounds. Although backpacks can lead to poor posture when they are not worn correctly, heavy backpacks do not cause scoliosis.

Problems Backpacks Can Pose

Many different things can lead to back pain. These include increased participation in sports or exercise, poor posture when sitting and long periods of inactivity. Some children can have back pain because of a heavy backpack. When a heavy backpack is placed incorrectly on the shoulders, the force of the weight can pull a child backwards. The child then compensates by bending forward at the hips or by arching the back. This can cause shoulder, neck and back pain.

Wearing a backpack over just one shoulder, may cause a child to lean to one side. This may result in shoulder, neck or back discomfort. Backpacks with tight, narrow straps can dig into the shoulders, causing numbness, tingling or weakness in the arms. Also, a heavy backpack can cause increased risk of falling by putting the child off balance.

Choosing the Right Backpack

  • Wide, padded shoulder straps
  • Two shoulder straps
  • Padded back
  • Lightweight backpack

Injury Prevention

  • Always use both shoulder straps.
  • Pack light (10-15% of child’s weight)
  • Remove unneeded items
  • Lift properly by bending at the knees and grabbing the pack with two hands.

Adapted from American Academy of Pediatrics information on Backpack Safety, 11/2015: http://tinyurl.com/7oozzls

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Jordan, age 17 of Sadler

Jordan_BlogJordan, age 17 of Sadler, loves snowboarding. Jordan wears a prosthesis on his right leg, and he has been a patient at the hospital for the last five years. His favorite things include skittles, playing basketball and hanging out with friends. Though this is his first ski trip with Scottish Rite Hospital, Jordan first learned to snowboard six years ago. That is something he’s really proud of, and he can’t wait to get back on the mountain.

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2017 will mark the 36th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences receive practical recreational therapy, while also having the opportunity to grow, build confidence and bond with others similar to them.

For more information, visit scottishritehospital.org/amputee-ski-trip.

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Diana, age 15 of Garland

Christy_BlogDiana, age 15 of Garland, has been coming to Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children since she was a baby. She wears a prosthetic leg and has never been skiing or snowboarding. However, Diana says she loves snow and cold weather! She plays the violin in her school orchestra and her favorite things include chocolate covered strawberries and the TV show Gravity Falls. When she grows up, Diana hopes to be a veterinarian. Diana says she looks up to her parents, and the thing she is most proud of is knowing her mom and dad are proud of her.

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2017 will mark the 36th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences receive practical recreational therapy, while also having the opportunity to grow, build confidence and bond with others similar to them.

For more information, visit scottishritehospital.org/amputee-ski-trip.

Karen’s Moment – Volunteer Services

02_FEB_Karen and George_BLOG

Whether it’s greeting patient families or helping behind the scenes, more than 1,000 volunteers contribute to the mission of Scottish Rite Hospital. Volunteers, like Karen are there every moment, supporting and caring for our patients like a good friend.

This month, we will be giving you a deeper look at our Volunteer Services department on our Facebook page. Join us for volunteer stories, flashbacks and interesting facts. For more information, visit scottishritehospital.org/volunteer.

A Look Inside PRiSM for Parents of Young Athletes – Sports Medicine

Scottish Rite Hospital recently co-hosted the fourth annual Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine (PRiSM) meeting. The two-day conference included discussion of various clinical cases and medical professionals were able to share innovative ideas for research to provide better care for young athletes. Co-chair of the Program Committee for PRiSM and Assistant Chief of Staff at Scottish Rite Hospital, Philip Wilson, M.D. lined up over 75 presentations by physicians, physical therapists, movement science experts, and even an expert in veterinary pathology.

The attendees represented more than 75 children’s hospitals, universities and major medical centers across the country and beyond. Here are some topics that were discussed this weekend:

  • Injury Prevention – We continue to see injuries in young athletes that are preventable. Though we work hard to identify the best ways to treat these injuries, our organizations must continue to share messages about how to prevent these. Read more here.
  • Osteochondtritis Dissecans (OCD) – A small group of attendees spent an entire day discussing current research and future plans for studies to improve the treatment of OCD in the knee, the group is known as Research in Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee (ROCK), you can learn more about OCD and this group here.
  • Movement Science and Return to Sports – There is agreement across the country that returning to sports after an injury is an important decision that is not based on time, we must look at how the body has recovered and whether or not it is ready for the multi-direction movements in sports. Evidence based functional tests are recommended. At Scottish Rite Hospital, we use several including the Y-Balance Test, watch a video here.
  • Sports Concussions – As we learn more and more about concussions, experts continue to emphasize early recognition and medical clearance for returning to sports. Presenters shared survey results that show we have more work to do to help parents, coaches and young athletes to be confident with their knowledge and ability to recognize signs and symptoms of concussions. Learn more about sports concussions here.

Scottish Rite Hospital Staff Chuck Wyatt, R.N., C.P.N.P., R.N.F.A., Amanda Fletcher, R.N., C.P.N.P., R.N.F.A and Lorenzo Vite, P.T.

You can read more about PRiSM and see a full program list on their website. Many of our sports medicine staff members attended and volunteered to help make the weekend a success. Events like these help us develop our team to provide outstanding care to young and growing athletes.

For information about injury prevention and pediatric sports medicine, please visit our website at scottishritehospital.org/sports.

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Harrison, age 14 of Burleson

Harrison_BlogHarrison, age 14 of Burleson, has been a patient of Scottish Rite Hospital since he was an infant. He was born with a condition called fibular hemimelia, which resulted in a right leg amputation. In his spare time, Harrison enjoys riding his bike and playing video games with friends. This will be Harrison’s first time skiing. While he’s excited to get on the mountain, this pepperoni pizza lover is especially excited for the pizza party that happens on Friday night of the Ski Trip.

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2017 will mark the 36th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences receive practical recreational therapy, while also having the opportunity to grow, build confidence and bond with others similar to them.

For more information, visit scottishritehospital.org/amputee-ski-trip.

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Andria, age 14 of Leonard

Andria_BlogAndria, age 14 of Leonard (a little town northeast of McKinney), has been a prosthetics patient at Scottish Rite Hospital for a year and a half. Andria was a passenger in a car accident that ultimately took her leg. She is an active teen and is taking a heavy load of science classes at school. Her goal is to become a doctor: either a surgeon or possibly an anesthesiologist. She has her sights aimed at attending Texas A&M University and going on to medical school. Andria is excited about the ski trip and seeing all of the snow in Colorado. This will be her first trip on an airplane and the first time she has traveled outside of Texas. Andria is looking forward to meeting new friends and having a great time. She did admit that she likes her sleep but says that she will be up and ready to hit the slopes every morning!

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2017 will mark the 36th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences receive practical recreational therapy, while also having the opportunity to grow, build confidence and bond with others similar to them.

For more information, visit scottishritehospital.org/amputee-ski-trip.