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How Occupational Therapy Can Help Your Child

What Is Occupational Therapy?

Occupations are all of the activities we do in our daily lives. For a child or adolescent, occupations include play, school, work, leisure activities and daily routines. Occupational therapy (OT) helps when a child’s disability or illness interferes with these activities.

Occupational Therapy Services at TSRHC

Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) offers occupational therapy services for our patients and their unique needs. Occupational therapists are part of the multi-disciplinary team who work closely with your child’s doctor. Our occupational therapists are licensed professionals who have advanced training in many areas related to the orthopedic, developmental, neurological and rheumatology populations we serve at TSRHC. Additionally, several of our occupational therapists participate in on-going research projects within the hospital. OT services may be included as part of your child’s clinic appointment with the physician, their hospital stay or may be performed on an individualized outpatient basis.

Occupational therapy services that maybe ordered by the doctor include:

  • Daily activities training (such as dressing, bathing and toileting)
  • Adaptive equipment needed after surgery
  • Specialized rehabilitation to increase independence in functional activities
  • Upper-extremity (arm) splints
  • Clinical feeding evaluations for patients with an acute need
  • Upper-extremity prosthetic training
  • Transfer training and safe positioning
  • Custom wheelchairs and adaptive equipment

Occupational therapy can be extremely beneficial for patients with a variety of pediatric conditions. In addition to being able to enjoy more activities within their daily lives, children often develop a greater sense of independence and self-confidence when gaining new skills and abilities with help from OT. If you are interested in learning more about the occupational therapy services offered at Scottish Rite Hospital, we invite you to discuss options with your child’s medical team.

 

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Erika, age 17 of Wylie

ErikaErika, age 17 of Wylie, Texas, has been a patient at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) since 2006. She had severe clubfeet as a child, which required amputation. Erika is most looking forward to seeing the old ski instructors from last year and getting to know new friends on the trip. She loves skiing and can’t wait to go on this once in a lifetime trip to be around people who she can easily relate to about everyday struggles and life.

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2016 will mark the 35th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences are given the opportunity to discover the joy of skiing and snowboarding, while gaining confidence with lifelong friends.

Since the first Amputee Ski Trip in 1981, the community has teamed up with the hospital to make this opportunity possible to patient families. American Airlines has sponsored the trip since 2005. Prior to that, Delta Airlines supported the event for more than 20 years. Multiple other generous supporters from the community, including the Stephen M. Seay Foundation help make this trip possible!

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Taj, age 16 of Fort Worth

TAJ.2 copyTaj, age 16 of Fort Worth, Texas, moved from New Orleans to Texas after hurricane Katrina. Once in Texas, Taj came to Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children for treatment on his foot. He was born with fibular hemimelia and this condition resulted in a Symes amputation, which kept his heel intact but removed the rest of his foot. This amputation has done nothing to slow Taj down. He is most looking forward to snowboarding this year and is excited to enjoy his time in Colorado, hanging out and catching up with the other ski trip participants.

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2016 will mark the 35th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences are given the opportunity to discover the joy of skiing and snowboarding, while gaining confidence with lifelong friends.

Since the first Amputee Ski Trip in 1981, the community has teamed up with the hospital to make this opportunity possible to patient families. American Airlines has sponsored the trip since 2005. Prior to that, Delta Airlines supported the event for more than 20 years. Multiple other generous supporters from the community, including the Stephen M. Seay Foundation help make this trip possible!

January: Prajith’s Moment to Shine

Meet Prajith, age 10, of Austin, with Christopher H. Martin, artist.

 

My Defining Moment:

The main reason my family moved from California to Texas was to get my scoliosis treated at TSRHC.

A Moment to Remember:

The staff knew what my favorite toy was and surprised me with it after surgery to help my recovery.

My Moment to Shine:

I feel less self-conscious about my posture and now I confidently stand tall for pictures.

Give a Patient like Prajith a Moment to Shine:

Your gift of $400 helps underwrite the cost of an X-ray for a child with scoliosis. To donate or learn about the hospital’s Sarah M. and Charles E. Seay / Martha and Pat Beard Center for Excellence in Spine Research, please visit tsrhc.org/center-for-excellence-in-spine-research.

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Sarah, age 16 of Wylie

IMG_0026 2Sarah, age 16 of Wylie, Texas, has been a patient of Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) since 2004. She has had two surgeries at TSRHC, one to separate her webbed fingers and one on her amputated leg. Sarah loves to snowboard and is excited to enjoy the snow. Her favorite memories from last year were talking with the other amputees and swapping funny stories; she is looking forward to making her friends laugh this year.

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2016 will mark the 35th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences are given the opportunity to discover the joy of skiing and snowboarding, while gaining confidence with lifelong friends.

Since the first Amputee Ski Trip in 1981, the community has teamed up with the hospital to make this opportunity possible to patient families. American Airlines has sponsored the trip since 2005. Prior to that, Delta Airlines supported the event for more than 20 years. Multiple other generous supporters from the community, including the Stephen M. Seay Foundation help make this trip possible!

Take Home Tips from Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children

Love to play. Not just win.

Mom and Daughter Mayors Race 2015_233 copyIn the pre-teen years, athletes progress to a more competitive sport environment, and the pressures really start to grow. Winning, or being the best, becomes more important as elite team tryouts and college scholarship dreams come into play.

According to TSRHC Sport Psychologist, Dr. Erica Force, this is the window of time where athletes often begin to drop out of sports.

To encourage continued participation in sports, it is important for parents to foster a positive and fun sport environment. Parents can help their kids focus on more than just results of the competition by focusing on effort and lessons learned. Here are some ideas to help encourage a life-long love of sports:

– Be a good listener and offer encouragement regardless of the outcome of a game

– Keep your own emotions under control

– Ask about their experience while playing:

  • Did you put forth your best effort?
  • Did you have fun?
  • Did you help your team?
  • Were you a good sport?

To learn more about Scottish Rite Hospital’s Sports Medicine Center in Plano, please visit our website at scottishritehospital.org/sports. For information on TSRHC’s Psychology department, please visit scottishritehospital.org/psychology.

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Josiah, age 17 of Dallas

Josiah, age 17 of Dallas, Texas, has been a patient at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) since he was two years old. Leg length discrepancy first brought Josiah to Scottish Rite Hospital, but in 2012 he had an amputation and has since moved exclusively to the TSRHC IMG_0030 2prosthetics department. His favorite memory is falling down the bunny hill “millions of times” last year, and he is eager to get back out there. Josiah is excited to return to Colorado to have adventures with people like him. He’s also looking forward to seeing the friends he made last year.

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2016 will mark the 35th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences are given the opportunity to discover the joy of skiing and snowboarding, while gaining confidence with lifelong friends.

Since the first Amputee Ski Trip in 1981, the community has teamed up with the hospital to make this opportunity possible to patient families. American Airlines has sponsored the trip since 2005. Prior to that, Delta Airlines supported the event for more than 20 years. Multiple other generous supporters from the community, including the Stephen M. Seay Foundation help make this trip possible!

Dr. Wilson Advises Parents to Promote Lifetime Sports and General Fitness

We sat down with sports medicine expert Philip Wilson, M.D., pediatric orthopedic surgeon, to discuss his thoughts on lifetime sports.

What is a lifetime sport?

It’s an activity or sport that is enjoyable throughout your life. You can do these activities with a variety of people without being dependent on a team. It fits within any lifestyle, and you’re not forced to schedule around it.

How is this different from cross-training?

Untitled2It really depends on the motivating factor. If you’re focused on cross-training to get better for your primary sport, you may not stick with the activity for a long time. If you’re participating in a wide variety of activities to promote general health and well-being, I think you’re more likely to continue.

What are some examples of lifetime sports?

Hiking, tennis, golf, swimming, jogging, walking and bicycling

What can parents do to encourage these activities?

  • Leave time in the schedule for physical activities.
  • Ask your kids what they would like to do.
  • Lead by example. Show them that being active is a way of life.

What do you think will help to motivate kids to be lifetime athletes?

We should create a variety of opportunities for them to develop an interest in being active. I think of activities like – take a walk in a nature preserve, take advantage of your city’s jogging trails, try out different playgrounds or check out the local climbing gym. The options are endless when combining activities and the outdoors.

Why is this so important to you?

In my career, I’ve seen some athletes continue in their primary sport for a long time; I’ve also seen many give up for one reason or another. It’s a tough transition from being a dedicated athlete to “real life” activities. I believe that those who are well-rounded and have learned the long-term values of sport and fitness will be healthy adults. They will understand the values of maintaining an active lifestyle.

Read more tips to promote a positive attitude in young athletes in a previous post from our specialists in the Center for Excellence in Sports Medicine at Scottish Rite Hospital.

For information about injury prevention and pediatric sports medicine, please visit our website at scottishritehospital.org/sports.

Dallas Marathon Patient Champion Spotlight: Juliet, age 7 of Dallas

Juliet Ampariu age 7 of Corinth_40Starting in 2007, several Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) patients offered to help represent the many bright faces treated at the hospital by becoming a patient champion for the Dallas Marathon. The Patient Champion program is a way for the community to participate in race-weekend activities and fundraise on behalf of a patient. We are excited to introduce you to Juliet!

Juliet Ampariu age 7 of Corinth_07

Juliet, age 7, from Corinth, Texas, has been coming to TSRHC since she was 2 months old. She was born with amniotic band syndrome, and it was discovered that she also had hip dysplasia. Juliet loves the hospital, including the doctors, nurses and volunteers and the crafts she gets to make while visiting. When it’s time to leave, Juliet’s mom often has to beg her to go.

Juliet eats, sleeps and breathes softball. She is a pitcher in her softball league, where she is the youngest player on the team. Even though Juliet’s bat bag is bigger than she is, she already has a changeup and a wicked fastball. Juliet loves reading and dreams of being a doctor. She is so excited to cheer on the Dallas Marathon runners! Look for her wave, as she has been practicing her princess pageant wave for months to encourage all of the participants.

We invite you to join our team of fundraisers on behalf of the Patient Champions and all the patients of TSRHC through our Crowdrise page.

 

Dallas_Marathon_Logo_1971**TSRHC has been the primary beneficiary of the Dallas Marathon since 1997. This year’s event will take place on Sunday, December 13.