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March: Isaac’s Moment to Shine

03_MAR_Isaac_Hi

Meet Isaac, age 11, of Amarillo.

My Defining Moment:

The fingers on my left hand are stuck together except for my thumb. My doctor referred me to TSRHC to get help.

My Moment to Remember:

TSRHC is really nice. Everyone is friendly. The first time there, I saw lots of kids and I knew I wasn’t alone.

My Moment to Shine:

Camp has taught me how to do things I couldn’t do before and I try new things. I feel like we are family away from family.

Give a Patient like Isaac a Moment to Shine: A donation of $500 will contribute toward research that benefits children with hand and upper limb differences. To donate or learn about TSRHC’s Charles E. Seay, Jr. Hand Center and specialized camps, please visit scottishritehospital.org.

The Cotton Patch Cafe Challenge is Back!

Join us as we celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Cotton Patch Cafe Challenge!

Screen Shot 2016-02-25 at 2.42.56 PMThanks to our wonderful friends at the Cotton Patch Cafe, every donation of $25 made to TSRHC beginning February 29th will be matched in $25 Cotton Patch Cafe gift cards (up to $1,000 per donor).

Give today and claim a heapin’ helpin’ of home-cooked goodness for you and yours, compliments of the Cotton Patch Cafe. But hurry…once we raise $250,000 and reach our $1 million cumulative goal, the 2016 Challenge will end!

All proceeds from the Cotton Patch Cafe Challenge directly benefit TSRHC and allow the hospital to provide world-class medical care to kids, regardless of any family’s ability to pay. With the help of our great friends at the Cotton Patch Cafe and dedicated donors like you, we can continue in our mission, bringing health, hope and happiness to thousands of children. We greatly appreciate your support!

Take The Challenge Today!

Heart Health tips for Young Athletes from our Sports Medicine Team

As a nation, we celebrate our loved ones and cardiac health in February. In pediatric sports medicine, we are passionate about heart health. A well-rounded view of heart health means being aware of the signs and symptoms of sudden cardiac death.

The sudden death of a young athlete is rare, but when it happens, it is a devastating event for a family, team and community to experience. For this reason, the topic continues to be the center of discussions in sports medicine.

Experts agree on these key steps to protect young athletes:

REPORT

Signs, symptoms and any history of cardiac problems in young athletes should be reported at each pre-participation evaluation and when new problems develop. Some examples are chest pain, shortness of breath, and passing out.

ASK

Knowing your family’s medical history is a critical step to prevent sudden cardiac death in healthy young athletes. Ask your family members about a history of cardiac problems or sudden death in the family.

PREPARE

Learn the emergency plan for adults or youth who become unconscious at schools and sports venues. Know where to find the closest AED (automatic external defibrillator) and be sure it is accessible to all event participants, every time.

TexaHearts Scottish Rite Hospital pediatricians and sports medicine experts, Shane Miller M.D. and Jane Chung, M.D., advise parents to take athletes to their pediatrician for pre-participation evaluations. Though some schools and organizations may not require a release, seasonal check-ups and discussions with the doctor can help to prevent many problems and to address injuries before they become more serious.Learn more about pediatric orthopedics and sports medicine at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital at scottishritehospital.org/sports.

Tips to Keep Safe on the Slopes

When hitting the slopes, it’s important to have the right equipment. Staying safe while skiing is a top priority for the 35th Annual Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children Amputee Ski Trip. In honor of this special event, we’ve put together some important safety tips for fun in the snow.

  • Wear Sunscreen – Even if the day is overcast and freezing cold, you can still get sunburned on the slopes. The bright white snow reflects the sun’s rays and can cause major burns. To avoid getting sunburned, wear plenty of sunscreen and don’t forget to re-apply throughout the day
  • image1Stay Hydrated – Drinking lots and lots of water is the best protection against altitude sickness. Altitude sickness is caused when the body struggles to adjust to higher altitudes with thinner oxygen. Our ski trip participants are equipped to stay hydrated this year with personalized water bottles from our friends at Saint Bernard. Having water on hand as you transition to a higher altitude is the best way to avoid getting sick.
  • Wear a Helmet – Wearing a helmet on the slopes is the best way to protect your head in the event of a fall. Helmets can help prevent concussions and other major head trauma. Thanks to our friends at Giro, the teens on this year’s trip will have helmets to protect them as they learn how to ski.
  • Stay Warm – It’s important to stay warm while you ski. Hypothermia happens when the body loses heat faster than it can produce heat. This results in low body temperature, which can cause organs to function improperly. The teens on the ski trip will stay warm and safe thanks to our friends at Obermeyer while they ski.
  • RIC_5123Warm Up and Cool Down – When participating in strenuous physical activity, especially when learning a new sport, it’s critical to stretch and cool down properly. Stretching before starting the day can help keep the body loose and flexible for exercise. Cooling down at the end of the day with more stretching or a soak in the hot tub can prevent fatigue for the day ahead.

We hope these tips help inspire safety on the mountain. We wish the teens on this year’s trip a fun time in Colorado.

Thanks again to our friends at Saint Bernard, Giro and Obermeyer for keeping our skiers safe and warm on the Annual Amputee Ski Trip.

TSRHC Patient Delaney Named 94.9 KLTY Student Athlete of the Month

We are excited to announce that Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) patient Delaney is 94.9 KLTY’s Student Athlete of the Month.

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Delaney pictured with her parents.

About Delaney

Age / Grade: 18 / Senior

School: Dallas Christian School

Sport: Soccer

Why She Was Nominated: Delaney is a great example of faith and perseverance. She has been a leg amputee since she was just 10 days old. She pursues every goal with passion and determination.

She has been playing soccer since she was four, and she has cheered since the sixth grade. Last year, she had an additional surgery on her leg and spent two months without her prosthesis. During this time, she performed and danced in her school musical, Annie.

Delaney has spent her summers volunteering at TSRHC, and she plans to study early childhood development at Texas Tech University, with the goal of becoming a Child Life Specialist to help children in the same way she received help.

Congratulations Delaney!

**TSRHC is a sponsor of the KLTY Student Athlete of the Month Program. Listen to the on-air call with Delaney, where they let her know about the honor and shared her story with KLTY listeners.

 

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Natalie, age 14 of Fort Worth

NatalieNatalie, age 14 of Fort Worth, has been a part of the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) family for most of her life. Born without a fibula bone, she came to TSRHC when she was only 11 months old to have her left foot amputated. But Natalie didn’t let that slow her down. She’s participated in Scottish Rite Hospital’s Learn to Golf programs and by eight years old, this generous girl was organizing lemonade stands and donating the proceeds back to the hospital.

In her free time, Natalie likes sketching and painting, and dreams of becoming an artist one day. She also enjoys playing video games and practicing the piano. Although she’s been skiing before, this is Natalie’s first time on the Amputee Ski Trip and she’s excited to hit the slopes with fellow patients.

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2016 will mark the 35th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences are given the opportunity to discover the joy of skiing and snowboarding, while gaining confidence with lifelong friends.

Since the first Amputee Ski Trip in 1981, the community has teamed up with the hospital to make this opportunity possible to patient families. American Airlines has sponsored the trip since 2005. Prior to that, Delta Airlines supported the event for more than 20 years. Multiple other generous supporters from the community, including the Stephen M. Seay Foundation help make this trip possible!

Don’t Let a Basketball Injury Slow Down Your Young Athlete – TSRHC Sports Medicine

Hand injuries are common in youth basketball. Some studies suggest there are as many as 7-10 injuries per 1,000 practices or games. Christine Ho, M.D., Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) pediatric orthopedic hand surgeon, offers some insight.

MorganDr. Ho sees hand injuries in all ages and all skill levels of basketball players. In some cases, it is a jammed finger, in others, a dislocation, or even a torn tendon.

In young athletes, bones are still growing, and injuries to the growth plates need special attention in surgical and non-surgical care of hand injuries. With proper recognition and treatment from the beginning, long-term problems can be avoided.

Whether the injury happens when receiving a pass or grabbing the rim, Dr. Ho offers this advice:

  • Any deformity should be evaluated soon after the injury, waiting more than a few days can increase the chance of needing surgery.
  • Swelling, pain or difficulty moving that lasts more than 2-3 days should be evaluated by a medical provider and with an X-ray.
  • X-rays are designed to show broken bones, but they may miss a problem with the soft tissues in the hand. There can be torn ligaments or tendons that will not be seen on x-rays and additional imaging may be recommended, depending on the physical exam.

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Download our PDF with more basketball tips.

For information about injury prevention and pediatric sports medicine and orthopedic conditions, please visit our website at scottishritehospital.org/sports.

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Jeremiah, age 16 of Dallas

IMG_5682Jeremiah, age 16 of Dallas, Texas, has been a patient at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) since 2006. Due to the development of osteosarcoma in his bones, he now wears a full leg prosthesis. Jeremiah likes to play basketball and video games with friends outside of school and wants to be an aircraft engineer when he grows up. He is most excited for his first plane ride ever, and he’s also looking forward to learning how to ski!

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2016 will mark the 35th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences are given the opportunity to discover the joy of skiing and snowboarding, while gaining confidence with lifelong friends.

Since the first Amputee Ski Trip in 1981, the community has teamed up with the hospital to make this opportunity possible to patient families. American Airlines has sponsored the trip since 2005. Prior to that, Delta Airlines supported the event for more than 20 years. Multiple other generous supporters from the community, including the Stephen M. Seay Foundation help make this trip possible!

Treating Perthes Disease

Also known as Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, Perthes disease is a childhood disorder of the hip. The disease affects the ball portion of the hip joint, known as the femoral head. Perthes is uncommon— approximately 5 to 10 children per 100,000 will be diagnosed — and it more commonly affects boys -1 in 760 boys. Here are some interesting facts about this pediatric hip disorder.

What Happens to the Hips in Perthes Disease

In a normal hip joint, the round head of your femur fits into the round socket in the pelvis. Perthes disease interrupts the blood flow to the femoral head, causing all or part of it to die due to lack of blood. The bone death is medically referred to as osteonecrosis.

Once the bone dies, the femoral head is more prone to breakage and heals poorly. As a result, the pressure and weight on the bone from normal rigorous activities can cause the round portion to become flat over few months to a year after the diagnosis. For one to two years after bone death occurs, new bone gradually begins to fill in the areas where the body has removed away the dead bone.

The Cause of Perthes Is Still Unknown

Screen Shot 2016-02-05 at 1.12.53 PMWhile we know what happens to the hip to alter the shape of the femoral head, we still don’t know what causes the precipitating interruption of blood flow. We also know that Perthes is not heritable, since less than five percent of its patients have a family history of the disease. However, some other heritable hip conditions or blood disorder can mimic Perthes, such as multiple epiphyseal dysplasia and sickle cell disease. History of taking corticosteroid for treatment of asthma, inflammatory conditions, or cancer can also produce bone necrosis that mimics Perthes.

Diagnosing Perthes Disease

Because so many other diseases can mimic the symptoms of Perthes, it is known as a disease of exclusion. Doctors will rule out other conditions by taking a careful look at medical history and performing a physical exam. The physician will typically ask about the following diseases to rule them out:

  • Family history of hip disorders or early joint replacement
  • Steroid use, such as for asthma
  • Prior hip surgeries
  • History of sickle cell disease
  • History of hip infection
  • History of endocrine or clotting disorders

To confirm a potential Perthes diagnosis, doctors will perform an X-ray of the hips. If the X-ray is taken too soon after symptoms have begun, it may appear normal. In that case, physicians can order a very sensitive diagnostic test called perfusion MRI if they still suspect Perthes.

Treatments and Complications

The body will naturally remove and replace the dead bone of the femoral head with new bone, so, to some extent, Perthes heals itself. However, the healing process may be slow and even after healing has taken place, the femoral head may not return to its original round shape. When that fails to happen, patients may experience long-term complications, such as pain, stiffness and a greater risk of arthritis later in life.

Screen Shot 2016-02-05 at 1.24.29 PMUntil the healing phase is complete, non-surgical treatments might include crutches, wheelchairs, casting and/or bracing, and reduced physical activity. Surgical treatments might include pelvic or femoral osteotomy, a process that reshapes the pelvis or femur.

While Perthes is in some ways self-healing, femoral heads sometimes don’t heal properly. With the interventions we have today and new treatment knowledge about the condition, those with Perthes can usually return to daily activities and sports activities without problems.

For more information about Perthes Disease and becoming a patient at TSRHC, visit the hip disorders section on our website.