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Don’t Let a Basketball Injury Slow Down Your Young Athlete – TSRHC Sports Medicine

Hand injuries are common in youth basketball. Some studies suggest there are as many as 7-10 injuries per 1,000 practices or games. Christine Ho, M.D., Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) pediatric orthopedic hand surgeon, offers some insight.

MorganDr. Ho sees hand injuries in all ages and all skill levels of basketball players. In some cases, it is a jammed finger, in others, a dislocation, or even a torn tendon.

In young athletes, bones are still growing, and injuries to the growth plates need special attention in surgical and non-surgical care of hand injuries. With proper recognition and treatment from the beginning, long-term problems can be avoided.

Whether the injury happens when receiving a pass or grabbing the rim, Dr. Ho offers this advice:

  • Any deformity should be evaluated soon after the injury, waiting more than a few days can increase the chance of needing surgery.
  • Swelling, pain or difficulty moving that lasts more than 2-3 days should be evaluated by a medical provider and with an X-ray.
  • X-rays are designed to show broken bones, but they may miss a problem with the soft tissues in the hand. There can be torn ligaments or tendons that will not be seen on x-rays and additional imaging may be recommended, depending on the physical exam.

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Download our PDF with more basketball tips.

For information about injury prevention and pediatric sports medicine and orthopedic conditions, please visit our website at scottishritehospital.org/sports.

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Jeremiah, age 16 of Dallas

IMG_5682Jeremiah, age 16 of Dallas, Texas, has been a patient at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) since 2006. Due to the development of osteosarcoma in his bones, he now wears a full leg prosthesis. Jeremiah likes to play basketball and video games with friends outside of school and wants to be an aircraft engineer when he grows up. He is most excited for his first plane ride ever, and he’s also looking forward to learning how to ski!

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2016 will mark the 35th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences are given the opportunity to discover the joy of skiing and snowboarding, while gaining confidence with lifelong friends.

Since the first Amputee Ski Trip in 1981, the community has teamed up with the hospital to make this opportunity possible to patient families. American Airlines has sponsored the trip since 2005. Prior to that, Delta Airlines supported the event for more than 20 years. Multiple other generous supporters from the community, including the Stephen M. Seay Foundation help make this trip possible!

Treating Perthes Disease

Also known as Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, Perthes disease is a childhood disorder of the hip. The disease affects the ball portion of the hip joint, known as the femoral head. Perthes is uncommon— approximately 5 to 10 children per 100,000 will be diagnosed — and it more commonly affects boys -1 in 760 boys. Here are some interesting facts about this pediatric hip disorder.

What Happens to the Hips in Perthes Disease

In a normal hip joint, the round head of your femur fits into the round socket in the pelvis. Perthes disease interrupts the blood flow to the femoral head, causing all or part of it to die due to lack of blood. The bone death is medically referred to as osteonecrosis.

Once the bone dies, the femoral head is more prone to breakage and heals poorly. As a result, the pressure and weight on the bone from normal rigorous activities can cause the round portion to become flat over few months to a year after the diagnosis. For one to two years after bone death occurs, new bone gradually begins to fill in the areas where the body has removed away the dead bone.

The Cause of Perthes Is Still Unknown

Screen Shot 2016-02-05 at 1.12.53 PMWhile we know what happens to the hip to alter the shape of the femoral head, we still don’t know what causes the precipitating interruption of blood flow. We also know that Perthes is not heritable, since less than five percent of its patients have a family history of the disease. However, some other heritable hip conditions or blood disorder can mimic Perthes, such as multiple epiphyseal dysplasia and sickle cell disease. History of taking corticosteroid for treatment of asthma, inflammatory conditions, or cancer can also produce bone necrosis that mimics Perthes.

Diagnosing Perthes Disease

Because so many other diseases can mimic the symptoms of Perthes, it is known as a disease of exclusion. Doctors will rule out other conditions by taking a careful look at medical history and performing a physical exam. The physician will typically ask about the following diseases to rule them out:

  • Family history of hip disorders or early joint replacement
  • Steroid use, such as for asthma
  • Prior hip surgeries
  • History of sickle cell disease
  • History of hip infection
  • History of endocrine or clotting disorders

To confirm a potential Perthes diagnosis, doctors will perform an X-ray of the hips. If the X-ray is taken too soon after symptoms have begun, it may appear normal. In that case, physicians can order a very sensitive diagnostic test called perfusion MRI if they still suspect Perthes.

Treatments and Complications

The body will naturally remove and replace the dead bone of the femoral head with new bone, so, to some extent, Perthes heals itself. However, the healing process may be slow and even after healing has taken place, the femoral head may not return to its original round shape. When that fails to happen, patients may experience long-term complications, such as pain, stiffness and a greater risk of arthritis later in life.

Screen Shot 2016-02-05 at 1.24.29 PMUntil the healing phase is complete, non-surgical treatments might include crutches, wheelchairs, casting and/or bracing, and reduced physical activity. Surgical treatments might include pelvic or femoral osteotomy, a process that reshapes the pelvis or femur.

While Perthes is in some ways self-healing, femoral heads sometimes don’t heal properly. With the interventions we have today and new treatment knowledge about the condition, those with Perthes can usually return to daily activities and sports activities without problems.

For more information about Perthes Disease and becoming a patient at TSRHC, visit the hip disorders section on our website.

Our Pediatric Orthopaedic Education Series is this Saturday

Physicians and other health-care professionals attending the Pediatric Orthopaedic Education Series (POES) on Saturday will experience fully interactive sessions with 11 specialists from Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, according to Dr. Anthony Riccio, the course director.

Instead of a lecture, each of the nine continuing medical education sessions will be built around multiple-choice questions about the cases being presented. Participants can answer on their smartphones using the app, Poll Everywhere.

The responses will guide the direction of the sessions, which cover such conditions as trauma, musculoskeletal infection, back and hip pain, scoliosis, hip dislocation, rheumatologic disease and athletic injuries.

Riccio“Traditional continuing medical education usually consists of didactic lectures and a brief Q&A,” Riccio says. “This will be a discussion tailored to meet the needs of the audience completely. We think it’s a more effective form of adult education.”

Titled Keeping Out of Trouble in Pediatric Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine: A Case Based Approach to Avoiding Jeopardy, POES also will feature two Jeopardy-like contests during which preselected participants can gauge what they’ve learned for fun and prizes.

This is the 18th year that the education series has been held at Scottish Rite Hospital. It takes place from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the hospital’s T. Boone Pickens Training and Conference Center at 2222 Welborn St. Participation in POES is worth up to 6.25 credits from the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education.

Course director Riccio is a pediatric orthopedic surgeon at Scottish Rite Hospital. He graduated from the Georgetown University School of Medicine and served five years in the U.S. Navy, during which he was director of pediatric orthopedics at the Naval Medical Center in San Diego.

For more information about POES or to register, visit http://community.tsrhc.org/POESDallas.

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Tatyana, age 15 of Corsicana

1451895417882Tatyana was born with amniotic band syndrome; a condition that caused her to have her right leg amputated when she was just one year old. Luckily, she was in the expert care of Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC). Today, Tatyana is a vibrant 15-year-old living in Corsicana. When she is not playing trumpet in her school band, she likes to spend time with her friends. Inspired by the care that she has received at TSRHC, Tatyana has dreams of one day becoming a doctor. She is excited for the opportunity to travel to Colorado to learn how to ski.

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2016 will mark the 35th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences are given the opportunity to discover the joy of skiing and snowboarding, while gaining confidence with lifelong friends.

Since the first Amputee Ski Trip in 1981, the community has teamed up with the hospital to make this opportunity possible to patient families. American Airlines has sponsored the trip since 2005. Prior to that, Delta Airlines supported the event for more than 20 years. Multiple other generous supporters from the community, including the Stephen M. Seay Foundation help make this trip possible!

Calling All Dancers – Chance to Dance is February 16 – March 29

Screen Shot 2016-02-03 at 9.21.12 AMChance to Dance is an eight-week introductory dance class that is offered for our patients (both male and female) between the ages 5 and 12. This class is also open to the patient’s siblings and friends!

The class will explore different styles that make up popular social and cultural dance. No previous dance experience necessary.

Class Location

Solarium (4th Floor B-Building)
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children
2222 Welborn Street, Dallas, Texas 75219

Class Times

Each Tuesday, February 16 – March 29 from 7:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Final Performance

Friday, April 8 from 7:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Please note: Parents/Guardians must remain on campus during class.

To Register or For More Information

Please contact Mackenzi Summers, MS, CTRS
Phone: 214-559-8345
Email: mackenzi.summers@tsrh.org

About the Instructor

Lynn Moon Schellenberg has a professional dance background combined with more than 25 years of experience as a dance therapist. She specializes in early childhood movement education and yoga, and is registered with the American Dance Therapy Association.

Support for Chance to Dance is provided by The Dance Council of North Texas.

Did you know? – An Interview with Dr. Henry Ellis

We’ve told you that our sports medicine surgeon, Dr. Henry Ellis, is the medical director of our annual amputee ski trip for TSRHC patients, but did you know that he is also one of the team physicians for the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association?

How long have you been a team physician for the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association?

My first trip was training for the U.S. Women’s Alpine and Tech team in Valle Nevado, Chile in 2010.

Where have you traveled with them?

I have covered international events in South America, Germany and Austria. This year I am looking forward to participating in the Alpine World Junior Championship in Sochi, Russia.

How does this help you in your practice with young athletes?

Seeing athletes in their competitive environment reminds me what they need from me in the clinic. They need me to consider their specific sport and how their body may be able to continue training despite an injury.

What do you admire about the professional athletes on the U.S. Ski Team?

There’s no exchange for training on the slopes to improve technique and to practice sport-specific motions. Throughout the season, and even when the snow melts, these athletes are committed to training their whole bodies and cross training during their off season. Running, cycling, and training in the gym with and without weights improve endurance, muscle strength, balance and coordination, all critical components of the well-rounded young athlete.

Watch more of our interview with Dr. Henry Ellis:

See Dr. Ellis’ previous article about injury prevention in winter slope sports.

For information about injury prevention and pediatric sports medicine, please visit our website at scottishritehospital.org/sports.

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Joshua, age 16 of Houston

JoshuaJoshua, age 16 of Houston, has been a patient at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children since 2009 when he contracted meningococcemia and had his left foot amputated. Joshua hasn’t let the setback slow him down. He is a member of the Boys Scouts of America and plays guitar and competitive computer games. He plans to study music in college and become a composer. Joshua has been skiing with the Boys Scouts in New Mexico, where he tumbled down the hill. He says he looks forward to improving his skiing skills and playing in the snow – something he doesn’t get much of chance to do in Houston – on the Amputee Ski Trip. Joshua has previously attended camps sponsored by the Amputee Coalition of America.

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2016 will mark the 35th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences are given the opportunity to discover the joy of skiing and snowboarding, while gaining confidence with lifelong friends.

Since the first Amputee Ski Trip in 1981, the community has teamed up with the hospital to make this opportunity possible to patient families. American Airlines has sponsored the trip since 2005. Prior to that, Delta Airlines supported the event for more than 20 years. Multiple other generous supporters from the community, including the Stephen M. Seay Foundation help make this trip possible!

February: Candace’s Moment to Shine

02_FEB_Candace_Hi

Meet Candace, age 17, of Garland.

My Defining Moment:

I had cancer in my ankle when I was 4. My leg was amputated below the knew and my prosthesis came from TSRHC.

My Moment to Remember:

Wanda McFadden was my prosthetist from age 4 to 18. She made sure my leg fit perfectly – every time.

My Moment to Shine:

Learning to do moguls on the Amputee Ski Trip was a highlight for me. Moguls are on some of the most advanced slopes!

Give a Patient like Candace a Moment to Shine: Your Gift of $200 contributes to the cost of care for child with an amputation. To donate, learn more or watch a ski trip video, please visit scottishritehospital.org/annual-amputee-ski-trip. We are excited to celebrate the trip’s 35th anniversary this month!

Amputee Ski Trip Spotlight: Miranda, age 16 of Frisco

MirandaMiranda, age 16 of Frisco, Texas, has been a patient at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) since 2012. She wears a full prosthetic on her left leg. Miranda loves to dance; she is on her high school drill team and also likes tap and jazz. Outside of school, Miranda is a volunteer at TSRHC and wants to be a nurse when she grows up. She is most excited about learning to ski.

About the Annual Amputee Ski Trip

February 2016 will mark the 35th anniversary of the annual Amputee Ski Trip, held each year at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park, Colo. Fourteen teenage patients with limb differences are given the opportunity to discover the joy of skiing and snowboarding, while gaining confidence with lifelong friends.

Since the first Amputee Ski Trip in 1981, the community has teamed up with the hospital to make this opportunity possible to patient families. American Airlines has sponsored the trip since 2005. Prior to that, Delta Airlines supported the event for more than 20 years. Multiple other generous supporters from the community, including the Stephen M. Seay Foundation help make this trip possible!